AYP

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Report

2011

                                             (Based on fall 2010 NECAP Results)

 

This report will explain the School Accountability System based upon student performance.  Each school is evaluated separately in the main academic areas of reading and math.  Each whole group (all students) and each sub-group (free/reduced lunch, non-free/reduced lunch, with disability/without disability, African American, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, White, Non English Language Learner, English Language Learner) is evaluated as to whether or not that group meets the target (academic indicator).  Many of the sub-group populations in our schools have fewer than 40 students. Therefore the results are not a part of the decision-making process for adequate yearly progress. The following information is for each school.

 

Addison Central School  made AYP in all required areas in the all school category. Sub-group areas have fewer than 40 students, and are not reported.

 

Ferrisburgh Central School  made AYP in all required areas in the all school category. Sub-group areas have fewer than 40 students, and are not reported.

 

Vergennes Union Elementary School, despite significant overall improvement, as a whole school, failed to achieve its assigned Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO) in reading and mathematics. VUES now enters Year 2 School Improvement.  Students’ scores did not reach the AMO target in the all student category for the first time. Under the “free/reduced lunch” sub-category in reading, students’ scores did not reach the AMO target and were identified for the third year in a row.  Students’ scores did not reach the AMO target in the all student category in math for the first time. Under the sub-group category “free/reduced lunch”, students’ scores did not reach the assigned AMO target placing VUES in Year 2 School Improvement in math. In the fall of 2011 the State AMO Index Score Bar increased for the first time in three years. Reading increased by 33 points and math by 36 points raising the achievable goal and making it more challenging for many schools to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

 

Most other sub-groups have fewer than 40 students. Subsequently, VUES is required to engage in a variety of activities designed to address this deficit area.  Over the course of this school year, we work with a Vermont Department of Education consultant to improve our reading and math instruction and intervention plans. These activities range from increased professional development to modification in our academic intervention model.

Vergennes Union High School, as a whole school, failed to achieve its assigned Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO) in both reading and math.  Students’ scores did not reach the AMO target in reading for the first time in both the all student category and under the “free/reduced lunch” sub-category of students.  Math now falls in Year 1 Corrective Action. Students’ scores did not reach the AMO target in the all students category in math. Under the “free/reduced lunch” sub-category, students’ scores did not reach the AMO target for the fourth year in a row in math. This fall the State AMO Index Score Bar increased for the first time in three years. Reading increased by 33 points and math by 53 points raising the achievable goal and making it more challenging for many schools to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

 

Most other sub-groups have fewer than 40 students. Over the course of this school year, we are working with a Vermont Department of Education consultant to improve our reading and math instruction and intervention plans.

Students needing extra help are getting support. Struggling students have also been invited to attend summer school. VUHS is required to engage in a variety of required activities designed to address this deficit area. These activities include increased professional development for teachers, improvements to the curriculum, development of "common" assessments, developing a process for teachers to work more closely with students' progress data, and modifications in our academic interventions for all students.  Some recent examples of student interventions can be found in the VUHS section of this report.
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